Summer York FdA Costume for Theatre, TV & Film

Summer York

Summer York

FdA Costume for Theatre, Film and Television

Originally trained in textiles and costume construction at De Montfort University, Summer enjoyed a ten year career in museums and heritage before deciding to focus on becoming a costume maker for stage and screen. Specialising in tailoring, Summer’s industry work placement was with Sara Fay. She recently supervised Bristol Old Vic’s Touching the Void. Summer’s interpretation of Clemence Corp’s winning young costume design is currently on display at BOV.

BOVTS Credits:

Costume Maker: Far from the Madding Crowd (Redgrave Theatre), Chef (The Wardrobe Theatre).

Costume Supervision: 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, 62 Sperm Whales (BOVTS Online).

Costume Assistant/Dresser: Far From the Madding Crowd, Pericles, Snow Queen (Redgrave Theatre), The Laramie Project, Earthquakes in London (BOV, Weston Studio)

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Tailored Military Mess Jacket

Summer constructed this Victorian military mess jacket for Bristol Old Vic Theatre School’s 2020 production of Far from the Madding Crowd – designed by Max Dorey.

Working to interpret Max’s design rather than create a completely accurate military garment summer took inspiration from several sources.

The garment was drafted using an original historical military pattern. Summer finds the challenge of drafting using historical sources especially gratifying. The jacket features embroidered thistles which summer designed using images of traditional Scots Guard and embroidered by hand before stitching them to the garment.

Summer worked closely with the design and supervision teams to draft, fit, construct and finish this garment to the tight deadlines imposed by the company’s schedule.

Trousers cut by Summer York – Made by Lois Edmunds.

Bristol Old Vic’s Young Designers Competition – Titania

This costume was constructed for Bristol old Vic’s Young Designer Competition – designed by Clemence Corp (aged 7).

While interpreting the design summer tried to stay true to the original illustration as much as possible. The petticoat element of this costume consists of a kilometre of ruffled tulle. The dress was drafted by Summer to the models’ measurements and hand painted to resemble the design. Adorning this garment are a flock of hand-beaded hummingbirds. The wings were constructed by hand using traditional Elizabethan standing collar techniques and are held in place by a back plate that Summer made and incorporated into the undergarments of the costume. A carnival style headdress tops off the completed costume.

This costume is currently on display at Bristol Old Vic.

Tailored 18th Century Suit

This costume consists of frock coat, waistcoat, breeches and period shirt – designed by Design MA graduate Maria Terry. Working closely with Maria to realise the design this project became a great collaboration between the designer and maker.

Summer started by drafting a historical pattern using a grid method, she then drafted modern versions of the same garments and overlayed both patterns in order to scale up the historical draft to fit a modern form while retaining the original period style lines. Summer hugely enjoyed this project and felt that although this process would not be suitable when working to a tight deadline, it was a brilliant learning experience.

Summer mastered CAD for this project. She designed, vectorised, laser cut and applied the fruit themed trim.

I’m constantly delighted by the talent, commitment and drive of our students. Their curiosity and joy in the work gives us all energy and keeps me on my toes! My goal is to ensure that their voices serve their acting - both in theatre and recorded media. They need to be able to project, learn accents, respond to a wide variety of texts and have a voice that is healthy and be able to sustain long tours and tough filming schedules. This involves them working extremely hard – but having fun as well. When the new students see the final year students in production for the first time I know they’ll come into class the next day fully understanding the high standard they’re working to achieve. Carol Fairlamb, Head of Voice